Kalani Honua Blog

Monday, March 16, 2015

Ali Slous

"Nature does not hurry, yet everything is accomplished." ~ Lao Tzu

Are you ready to March forth? What has been unfolding beneath the surface of your life that is now ready for expression?
 
This month's powerful Spring Equinox is punctuated by a rare celestial event: a supermoon solar eclipse. A potent planetary alignment, the equinox supermoon eclipse heralds the arrival of a great burst of energy: the power necessary for new life to emerge from the (seemingly) dormant winter earth. If this winter season has felt particularly challenging, we can allow this supermoon eclipse to represent the shift to a completely new chapter in our lives.
 
During a solar eclipse, the moon, traditionally associated with our inner emotional being, temporarily blocks the light of the sun, representing our conscious awareness. While the light of consciousness is "off," - creating a disruption in ongoing mental processes like interpretation, classification, and judgment - we may open greater access to profound intuitive and emotional clarity.
 
With emotional clarity, it becomes possible to move "stuck" energy out of the way so that new emotional landscapes can emerge. When the light of consciousness comes back "on," we are receptive to new insights into what we must give up, change, or transform to manifest the highest possible outcome for our next chapter.
 
Fortunately, we need not "do" anything to harness the energy of this great shift. Rather, our simply being here on the planet at this auspicious time of awakening facilitates the alchemical process of transformation to unfold naturally, as all things do.

March Ha‘awina Hawai‘i | Mālamalama - Patience

Mālamalama means "the light of knowledge," and is also associated with English words including clarity, clear perception, and enlightenment.

Hawaiian creation myths refer to mālamalama as the light of creation that follows a period of darkness (po), as well as to the light of the moon (mahina), when it shines brightly against the night sky. From a mythological standpoint, mālamalama invokes the light of the sun as illuminator and life-giving deity in the sky.

Mālamalama also carries the meaning of spiritual enlightenment. In Hawaiian cultural teachings, mālamalama is described as the inner feeling of joy that arises when one becomes fully present in the task or interaction at hand. This joy compounds when one considers the collective as an extension of the self, and acts accordingly.

As we prepare for the Spring Equinox, we may contemplate mālamalama - the light - as the counterbalance to the dark. In doing so, we can help align ourselves and our loved ones with the inner light of clarity that inevitably follows the darkness.

- Haʻwina Hawaiʻi is our monthly celebration of Hawaiian culture and language -

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Tuesday, February 17, 2015

Ali Slous

Kalani announces ILLUMINATO on February 28th, 2015 – a nighttime light installation and performance art show that sets Kalani’s expansive campus aglow at the end of the winter season. In its third year, ILLUMINATO will present unique ways of experiencing light, visual, and performance arts, set against the canvas of Hawaii’s elements.

Kicking off Kalani’s fortieth anniversary year, ILLUMINATO strives to embody Kalani’s non-profit mission: to facilitate learning, healing, and wellness, utilizing Hawaii’s abundant natural and cultural gifts. An open invitation for creative self-expression, Kalani welcomes seasoned and novice artists, alike, to bring their vision to fruition as part of ILLUMINATO’s sensory wonderland.

“There is something magical about things that glow in the dark that bring out the kid in each of us. ILLUMINATO gives people of all ages a chance to renew our sense of awe and our desire for exploration” said Drew Delaware, Kalani’s Communications Manager and ILLUMINATO creator.

Outdoor exhibits will include fire-sculpture by Sprocket, professional fire-spinning and dancing, a candlelit labyrinth, and a unique improv-based performance by Big Island Improv in Kalani’s specialized watsu pool. Local Puna artists Rose Adare and Peggy Stanton will also contribute to the evening’s talented roster.

Centered around a thriving, volunteer-based intentional community, Kalani will draw a diverse mix of local residents, international visitors, and innovative artists for this one-of-a-kind experience. The pre-event revelry begins on Kalani’s Dining Lanai for an India-inspired meal, after which diners and show spectators can begin exploring campus. Event attendees are also encouraged to “wear” art, through creatively-lit costumes and glow-in-the-dark attire.

One of Kalani’s most highly anticipated events, ILLUMINATO celebrates the artist in each and every one of us.

To participate in the show, please contact [email protected].
To view images from ILLUMINATO's past, visit our Facebook Album.
Love taking pictures? Hashtag your images #ILLUMINATO to share your photography with the Kalaniverse.

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Friday, February 13, 2015

Ali Slous

"Nothing ever goes away until it teaches us what we need to know." - Pema Chodron

How do you heal yourself? Many healing modalities call for "letting go" or "releasing old patterns," but what does that mean and how can we apply it?

Although we are born as individuals, our experience on planet earth is a collective one. It is through cooperation with others - our families, friends, and colleagues - that we learn. And, each new experience with another provides us with an opportunity to meet ourselves.

Rather than look at the outer world as "separate," we can choose to see the outer world as an extension of self, shining the light of awareness on what thoughts, beliefs, and emotions are coming up within - and creating our external experience. With practice, we can become more sensitive to the ways in which each experience is designed to facilitate a deeper discovery of our capacity for love.

As our awareness of self deepens, we inevitably encounter experiences that bring up deeply embedded emotions such as pain and grief. At these times, we may find ourselves repeating similar, painful experiences, due to an old belief system that no longer serves our highest good. This cycle can lead to a feeling of victimization that holds the existing pattern in place.

However, it is within our most painful experiences that we are given the most profound opportunities to heal. We begin by recognizing the pattern, forgiving ourselves and others who have co-created it, and, finally, allowing the experience to pass. Over time, our hearts become more open to loving experiences that transcend what we previously thought possible.

February Ha‘awina Hawai‘i | Ahonui - Patience

Ahonui, translated literally, means "great breath," and can be applied as a practical tool for healing and self-realization. Ahonui is also associated with the English word "patience."

Whereas, in English, the word "patience" may connote the need to tolerate something unpleasant - potentially carrying the energy of victim consciousness - in Hawaiian, ahonui more closely signifies perseverance. Ahonui speaks to the process of recognizing ourselves in a challenging situation, focusing on what we are being asked to feel, and then moving through those emotions with ease. Rather than project our feelings externally, we are asked to go deeper within. 

We all encounter situations that ask us to dig deep, take responsibility for ourselves and our behaviors, and, finally, to forgive and let go. When applied to healing, ahonui reminds us to connect to the "great breath," one of the most powerful tools to bring us back into the present moment; a simple, but profound practice that helps us to release anything that is not love. 

- Haʻwina Hawaiʻi is our monthly celebration of Hawaiian culture and language -

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Thursday, January 15, 2015

Ali Slous

"Desire is the starting point of all achievement, not a hope, not a wish, but a keen pulsating desire which transcends everything." - Napoleon Hill

What does your heart truly desire? Do you allow yourself to want what you want?

As creative beings in an energetic universe, our desires - when aligned with cooperative thoughts, beliefs, and inspired action - manifest into experiences.

Our free will to create is supported so unconditionally that we can create what we want just as easily as what we do not want. The universe does not judge our desires.

Underlying each manifested experience is a set of beliefs; a series of thoughts that we have practiced over time. When we create an "unwanted" experience - rather than reject, judge or avoid it - we may choose to perceive it as an opportunity to get closer to our desired outcome. We can do so by releasing old limiting beliefs and by creating new beliefs that open us to possibilities beyond our previous frame of reference.

When we have integrated this lesson, we may begin to view challenging experiences with less trepidation and more excitement, understanding that each contrasting experience gets us closer to manifesting that which we truly desire. At these times, we can reaffirm our commitment to the process and trust that the universe is conspiring to make even our biggest dreams come true.

January Ha‘awina Hawai‘i | Pele and the 'Ohi'a Lehua

Metrosideros polymorpha, also known as the 'Ohi'a Lehua, is a species of flowering evergreen tree endemic (native) to Hawaiʻi. We selected the 'Ohi'a Lehua to symbolize Kalani's 40th anniversary year, for its ability to flourish despite challenging conditions, and because its color is befitting of our ruby anniversary.

According to Hawaiian legend, Pele became enamored with a handsome warrior named Ohia, not realizing he had already pledged his love to another - Lehua. When Ohia rejected Pele's marriage proposal, she turned him into a twisted tree, leaving Lehua devastated. Taking pity on the separated lovers, the gods turned Lehua into a flower on the tree, reuniting the lovers for eternity. Legend says that plucking this flower separates the lovers and fills the sky with rain.

The 'Ohi'a Lehua blooms sporadically throughout the year, which has baffled scientists. Contrasted against the black lava rock from which this resilient tree mysteriously grows, the 'Ohi'a Lehua reminds us that beauty often emerges from the fire of transformation.

- Haʻwina Hawaiʻi is our monthly celebration of Hawaiian culture and language -

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Saturday, December 20, 2014

Ali Slous

“Yesterday is gone. Tomorrow has not yet come. Let us begin.”
- Mother Theresa -

How present are you? How often do you focus your energy wholeheartedly into the here and now?

If Earth is an interdisciplinary, multidimensional school, then our assignment is embedded within the present moment. However, when we diffuse our energy reviewing the past or attempting to control the future, we may lose focus of what we are being asked to see, learn, or experience right now.

As creators, we magnetize the people, places, and experiences most needed for our mutual expansion. Each joy, heartache, challenge, and triumph is constructed from the center of our being, and we do not mis-create. The fullest expression of our true self becomes readily available when we release judgment of self-perceived "mistakes" and step into full acceptance of what is.

Present moment awareness, free of egoic judgments, is the foundational first step in consciously creating a life of contentment and bliss. Upon cultivating present moment awareness, we open ourselves to seeing the perfection in each of life's twists and turns - and approaching new challenges with trust.

Today's powerful New Moon Winter Solstice in Capricorn reminds us not only to align with our highest expression of self, but also to align with like-minded, like-spirited others to create mutually-beneficial agreements - working together to identify practical, manageable steps that move us in the direction of our individual and collective goals.


December Ha‘awina Hawai‘i | Laulima - Cooperation

 Loren Frohning, 2014 Hawai‘i Yoga FestivalThe Hawaiian word laulima translated literally means "many hands working together," an essential concept in Hawaiian culture emphasizing cooperation. Laulima underscores the importance of aiming for the highest good of all to ensure the best possible outcome - understanding that unity is imperative to progress.

When we apply the concept of laulima, we may become more finely attuned to the opportunity to collaborate with our peers, noticing that each person with whom we cross paths has something to share. When we shift our awareness to this truth, we become receptive to the gift of cooperation that propels us forward, together.

Photos by: Matt Bulger and Loren Frohning, 2014 Hawai‘i Yoga Festival

- Haʻwina Hawaiʻi is our monthly celebration of Hawaiian culture and language -

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Thursday, November 20, 2014

Ali Slous

“Waking up to who you are requires letting go of who you imagine yourself to be.”
- Alan Watts -

How have you reinvented yourself lately? When you release parts of yourself that are no longer in alignment, what remains?
 
Through awareness practices such as yoga and meditation, we become increasingly sensitive to our experience on subtle, energetic levels. Upon further reflection, we begin to understand that our outer reality is simply a reflection of our inner reality. With this understanding, we can reclaim the power to consciously reinvent ourselves.
 
 Loren Frohning, 2014 Hawai‘i Yoga FestivalReclaiming this power starts from the inside out. If every nook and cranny of our home is filled with clutter, clothes that do not fit, and stacks of papers and mail collecting dust, our energy fields may become stagnant or blocked. We can utilize the energy of November to shed these unneeded layers and open up new pathways for energy to flow.
 
Whether it's raking away fallen leaves, donating items to our local food pantry or thrift shop, or recycling items we no longer use, we can take daily actions to create space in our external world. When we practice creating space externally, we transmit a clear message to the conscious universe that we are ready for new and better experiences - both within and without.

November Ha‘awina Hawai‘i | Makia - Energy Goes Where Attention Flows

 Loren Frohning, 2014 Hawai‘i Yoga FestivalMakia is one of seven sacred concepts in Huna, a modern shamanic practice inspired by Hawaiian teachings. Makia signifies: energy goes where attention flows, teaching us that what we focus on is what we ultimately create. As powerful creator beings, this concept applies equally whether we focus on what we want to create or what we do not want to create.
 
When we apply Makia as a tool for conscious, deliberate creation, we may become aware of limiting perceptions, thought patterns, or beliefs that are no longer in alignment with who we are now. As we let go of these beliefs, we free ourselves from the known - while bravely stepping into the unknown.  
 
As we explore Makia this month, we may practice questioning even our longest held beliefs. When we release old beliefs, ideas, and labels that once contained us, we allow space for surprise and delight in each moment.

Photos by: Loren Frohning, 2014 Hawai‘i Yoga Festival
- Haʻwina Hawaiʻi is our monthly celebration of Hawaiian culture and language -

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Wednesday, October 15, 2014

Ali Slous

"The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes,
but in having new eyes.
"
- Marcel Proust -

 Matt Bulger

What project are you ready to (re)initiate? What inspired action can you take to make your vision a reality?

Each season is characterized by a unique energy signature that supports us in distinctive ways. This month, we are asked to renew our focus on projects laid to rest during the celebratory summer months.

To engage the (re)initiatory spirit of October, we must first undergo an energetic reboot. In doing so, it is helpful to take a critical look at how we spend our energy and then use that information to eliminate energetic drains.

We may also use this information to ensure that we are making sufficient time to rest and refill our energetic wells. If our current practices do not support our overall wellbeing, now is the time to (re)initiate constructive resting practices such as: spending time in nature, reflecting silently, and enjoying connection, creativity, and collaboration with our peers.

Once our reboot is complete, we can look at our projects with new eyes and identify clear actions that will allow us to realize them with ease. Rather than push to get every task done ourselves, our work is to hold the vision, take excellent care of ourselves, and trust that all necessary components always come together perfectly in the flow of life.

Photo credit: Matt Bulger

October Haʻawina Hawaiʻi | Pouli - Eclipse; darkness

CC BY-SA Thomas Tunsch

Pouli is the Hawaiian word for eclipse. With both a total lunar and a partial solar eclipse this month, we will experience the obfuscation of our luminaries - a temporary darkening of the bodies that illuminate our day and night.

We each experience the darkness differently. For some it triggers fear and unease, while for others, the dark symbolizes deep rest and regeneration.

As we work to rebalance our energetic systems, we may take refuge in a few moments of darkness - by shutting off the lights, the smart phone, the computer screen, or even allowing time to still our minds. We may find that, in the quiet darkness, we create space for new inspiration to strike. 

Photo credit: CC BY-SA Thomas Tunsch

- Haʻwina Hawaiʻi is our monthly celebration of Hawaiian culture and language -

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Tuesday, September 23, 2014

Ali Slous

"The meaning of life is to find your gift. The purpose of life is to give it away."
- Pablo Picasso -

When do you feel most powerful? How do you engage with your power? No matter our age, gender, cultural background, or profession, we each have access to unlimited potential when we uncover access to the power source within.

We enter this experience with gifts that may be expressed through our divine essence. However, it is only when we make a conscious effort to discover, explore, and share these gifts that we reach our fully-empowered potential. What gifts are lying dormant in you waiting for expression? How can we each better utilize our gifts to be of service to our communities and to this planet?

Reflecting upon these questions, we may come to realize that no one gift is more vital or better than another. Each individual's combination of unique talents, skills, and abilities is equally valuable - understanding that when we share our gifts, it inspires and enables others to discover and share theirs.

By choosing to live life to its fullest in this way, we are effectively contributing to a more powerful, authentic, and awakened humanity.

September Haʻawina Hawaiʻi | Mana - Power

The Hawaiian word mana translated literally means power, defined as "the power of the elemental forces of nature embodied in an object or person." Mana signifies the highly individualized and unlimited life energy that flows through all things.

As we each work on cultivating our unique abilities, we align with this mystical, invisible force that animates everything in our universe. The more we tap into our individualized mana, the more empowered we become to create.

In many cases, this practice of coming into alignment catapults us into experiences of change and transformation that shake us to our core and challenge old, outworn beliefs and destructive thought patterns. We may also find that certain people, places, and experiences must be let go to step fully into our power.

Although it may seem challenging at times, trusting and letting go are necessary processes to activate the path to expression of our highest, most powerful self.

- Haʻwina Hawaiʻi is our monthly celebration of Hawaiian culture and language -

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Thursday, August 28, 2014

Ashlyn Ku‘uleialoha Weaver

E Ku e,
Ke lawe nei au i ka ʻili, o keʻia laau
I mea hoʻola no ka maʻi o (mea)
Wehe aku ʻoe i na pilikia a me na poʻino a pau,
A me na maʻi a pau maluna o kona kino,
A lilo keʻia laʻau i laʻau hoʻola nona (or noʻu)
E Ku e

E Hina e,
Ke lawe nei au i ka ʻili, o keʻia laʻau
I mea hoʻola no ka maʻi o (mea)
Wehe aku ʻoe i na pilikia a me na poʻino a pau,
A me na maʻi a pau maluna o kona kino, 
A lilo keʻia laʻau hoʻola nona (or noʻu)
E Hina e.

 

Oh Ku
I take the bark of this tree
For the purpose of curing the sickness of (name)
Undo all the troubles and afflictions,
And all the sickness upon his/her body
And may this medicine become the healing medicine for him/her
Oh Ku

Oh Hina
I take the bark of this tree
For the purpose of curing the sickness of (name)
Undo all the troubles and afflictions,
And all the sickness upon his/her body And may this medicine become the healing medicine for him/her
Oh Hina

 -From June Gutmanis, Na Pule Kahiko

Hiking along a path in Hawai‘i is mesmerizing and spectacular. Shades of green engulf oneself as the outside world is left behind, a distant memory. The lush, tropical trails are thick with various plants, each unique in size, shape, and color. 

These same trails also hold medicines that can cure an upset stomach, mend heartbreaks, and forgive. How so? The flora that line the edge of the trails and paint the world a shade of green, can all be used to cure illnesses. This common practice of healing among Hawaiians is called la‘au lapa‘au. 

La‘au lapa‘au originated during the Polynesian Migrationroughly 1,500 years ago. Arriving on double-hulled canoes, a number of the plants species were introduced to the Hawaiian Islands. These species were primarily used for medicinal purposes throughout each voyage. As each individual stepped foot onto new terrain, they brought with them a wealth of knowledge of indigenous South Pacific flora. As the Polynesians populated each island, over time, they adapted to their surroundings, learning and studying the use of the native species.

Acclimating to the various terrains, the people of Hawai‘i lived completely in isolation. Assorted diseases located throughout heavily populated areas found in different parts of the world, were not known or contracted by the Hawaiian people. 

According to the Hawaiian Author and historian, Kamakau, illness was associated with evil doings, such as breaking kapu (probation). Only then would the Kahuna la‘au lapa‘au (medical doctors) be called upon to cure the sickened individual. The Kahuna la‘au lapa‘au would cure everyone individuals all the way up to the chiefs with remedies and solutions to heal and protect. 

La‘au lapa‘au was practiced throughout each region, becoming the source of healing for hundreds of years. This allowed the health of Hawaiian inhabitants to acclimate to illnesses found only in those specific regions, until the arrival of western explorers. Foreign contact brought new diseases, which flourished in Hawaii. Looking to the Kahuna la‘au lapa‘au to rid them of their newly introduced diseases, the Kahuna la‘au lapa‘au did not know how to cure people of these unidentified illnesses. 

These diseases ravaged the weakened immune systems of the Hawaiian people. For many years, the diseases left behind spread from one island to another, forcing various Kahuna la‘au lapa‘au’s to find new herbal remedies they could use as cures.. In 1820, English missionaries arrived, bringing with them a wealth of knowledge, and, most importantly, medicine that would finally cure these debilitating illnesses.

During the establishment of English missionaries, the practice of la‘au lapa‘au was ridiculed, and healers were labeled as heathens. Westerners became confused to the differences between medical practitioners (kahuna la‘au lapa‘au) and a sorcerer (kahuna ‘ana ‘ana) whose prayers cast upon an individual could cause death. 

Due to the disapproval of la‘au lapa‘au practice, westerners and the English missionary movement on the Hawaiian Islands encouraged the newly established Hawaiian government to enforce licensing for anyone who wanted to be a health practitioner. This caused the various kahuna practicing la‘au lapa‘au to move their practice underground.

Nearly one hundred years after the introduction of new diseases to Hawai‘i, an estimated 90% of the Hawaiian population was decimated. Accompanying the decrease in the Hawaiian population was the decline in important knowledge, including la‘au lapa‘au and ho‘oponopono. 

Today, indigenous practices of la‘au lapa‘au or Hawaiian herbal healing have been revitalized with a sense of renewed energy. The practice of la‘au lapa‘au was banned during the introduction of English missionaries until the Hawaiian revitalization in the late 1960’s and early 1970’s. When this revitalization erupted, many of the healers that surfaced were already well in to their seventies and eighties. These healers had a sense of urgency to preserve and perpetuate la‘au lapa‘au practices that were passed onto them from their parents, grandparents, and ancestors.

As we tune into the wisdom of ancestral Hawaiian healing practices, this revitalization of la‘au lapa‘au may once again thrive. Learning and practicing the art of la‘au lapa‘au restores the body with vital nutrients that are beneficial to mind, body, and spirit, and rids the body of invasive toxins. La‘au lapa‘au has beneficial properties which, when practiced on a regular basis, can rid the body of specific disease, diagnoses, and illnesses.

With attention, curiosity, and reverence, the art of laʻau lapaʻau may once again be celebrated for its wisdom.

Our La’au Lapa’au blog series has a mission of respectfully bringing the wisdom of Hawaiian healing to all.

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Thursday, June 26, 2014

Ali Slous
With his warm, personable demeanor and down-to-earth presence, you would never guess that “Bodies in Motion” creator Gilad Janklowicz is one of the fitness industry’s biggest stars and pioneers. Gilad has maintained a place in our homes and hearts - from television, to VHS, DVD, and, now, the Internet - for upwards of thirty years. Gilad returned to Kalani last week for his fifth-annual Fitness Adventure Camp, welcoming fans from all over the world to disconnect from their electronic devices and re-connect to their bodies, with nature, and to each other. 

Called to Hawaii from Palm Springs in the early 1980’s, Gilad was presented with “an offer he couldn’t refuse” to teach at the Honolulu Club, where he agreed to spend a year instructing three classes per day. As the demand to experience his workout at home became apparent, Gilad began the journey of producing his first television show in 1982; requiring him to seek funding and other resources to make his project a reality. By 1985, his show went from syndication in Hawaii, Nevada, and Texas to airing nationally on ESPN, where it ran for eleven years. Thirty years later, Gilad’s show is still going on Discovery Fitness & Health, and is considered the longest-running fitness show in America. 

Gilad’s longevity is in large part due to his ability to evolve, incorporating relevant fitness trends, while maintaining his signature style. His simple, yet memorable words of encouragement (“30 seconds more!” and "it's getting better every day!") and devotion to making his workouts fun and enjoyable have endeared him to devotees from across the globe. When Gilad comes to Kalani, it is an opportunity for him to meet some of the people he has impacted.

“[At Kalani], I have the chance to meet with people I haven’t met before and I get to see what affect this television medium has had on their lives. It never ceases to amaze me how the show really moves them. I try to make it fun, motivational, and positive. I’m here to share it.” 

When asked about the greatest hurdle people face in getting and staying fit, Gilad reports that time is an obstacle for many of his fans – yet, the very same people are constantly posting on Facebook. He asserts that it is not the lack of time that prevents people from incorporating fitness into their lives, but the need to allocate time correctly. For that reason, he offers 10-minute express workouts, that if done daily, will help people see incremental results. 

Gilad also notes that some of today’s “extreme” fitness trends often lead to injury and that he hopes to motivate people to get off the couch in a way that is safe and healthy. He reinforces that he wants people to walk away from his workout with energy to spare – so that his participants can come back and do it again the next day. 

Gilad’s background in the Israeli military and Olympic-level track and field training helped him understand that the body is “a fine-tuned machine.” He hopes his retreat participants will take away the idea that a simple equation - eating right, exercising, and resting, with consistency - will ensure they get results. 

Regarding why he continues returning to Kalani, Gilad elaborates:

“People come for the fitness experience, but from the get-go it is more than a fitness experience. I know what Kalani offers for people to emotionally let go. They get so much more than exercise and fitness, they get in touch with themselves, laugh, cry, and release. They make friends and become a tight group. Here, you’re able to put the brakes on, let yourself be, enjoy living with geckos and pigs and coqui frogs, outside-in.”

We have loved watching this release in action throughout Gilad’s retreat week for five years running – and look forward to each future visit!

For more information about Gilad Janklowicz, visit www.bodiesinmotionwithgilad.com
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